Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
Explore Colonial America and Early American history including the American Revolution, French and Indian War, Pirates, Slavery, War of 1812 and Lewis and Clark.

ColonialAmerica.com features colonial and early American historical content, news, videos and a searchable database with thousands of mappable historic sites and millions of indexed pages.



American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com

Dispatches, now posted DAILY, include news items, features, historical content, unaffiliated blog article links etc. Take note that along with some dispatches may be related videos, historical markers, sites etc., displayed below the story at right.

Placing your mouse cursor over a dispatch title will pause the scroll. Older content is searchable below.

Click here to restart Dispatches




Search for a dispatch by entering a keyword below:

Book Examines Crucial Partnerships of James Madison, the "Lost" Founding Father


As the jacket flap for this book notes, its subject was "Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence. [He] cared more about achieving results than taking the credit." And even though James Madison served as ...

click here for more.

American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
Absconded from the household of the President of the United States, ONEY JUDGE, a light mulatto girl, much freckled, with very black eyes and bushy hair. She is of middle stature, slender, and delicately formed, about 20 years of age. She has many changes of good clothes, of all sorts, but they are not sufficiently recollected to be described—As there was no suspicion of her going off, nor no provocation to do so, it is not easy to conjecture whither she has gone, or fully, what her design is; but as she may attempt to escape by water, all masters of vessels are cautioned against admitting her into them, although it is probable she will attempt to pass for a free woman, and has, it is said, wherewithal to pay her passage. Ten dollars will be paid to any person who will bring her home, if taken in the city, or on board any vessel in the harbour;—and a reasonable additional sum if apprehended at, and brought from a greater distance, and in proportion to the distance.

FREDERICK KITT, Steward.
Philadelphia, May 23, 1796