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American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
Legend: Selected Site Area Merchant Site Historic Site Historic Marker Historic Shipwreck
Marker data courtesy of hmdb.org   Some map icons courtesy of Map Icons Collection



1776 Mayflower : A Story of Courage, Community, and War
The Federalist Papers Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution
Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West John Adams
Benjamin Franklin : An American Life The Bloody & Brave History of Native American Warriors & the Women Who Supported Them
Click here for additional books


We the Kids : The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States The New Americans : Colonial Times: 1620-1689 (The American Story)
The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism & Treachery A History of US: Vol 3, From Colonies to Country (A History of Us)
Let It Begin Here!: Lexington & Concord: First Battles of the American Revolution George Washington, Spymaster: How the Americans Outspied the British and Won the Revolutionary War
They Called Her Molly Pitcher Now &  Ben : The Modern Inventions of Benjamin Franklin


Pirates and Traders: Gold! Hidden Treasures Hidden Object
Dedaloop (Kindle Fire Edition) Word Treasure
Treasure Island, The Experience Robinson Crusoe
The Patriots Hero Tales from American History - AudioBook

Selected Site

Gen. Henry Knox Trail


Northborough, MA, 01532




Through this place passed
General Henry Knox
in the winter of
1775 - 1776
to deliver to
General George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga used
to force the British Army
to evacuate Boston.

Erected by the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts 1927


Click on heading to visit the website (excludes markers).

Nearby Historic Sites

General Artemas Ward House



786 Main Street
Shrewsbury, MA, 01545

Marlborough Historical Society



377 Elm St
Marlborough, MA, 01752

Willard House and Clock Museum



11 Willard Street
North Grafton, MA, 01536

Click on any heading to visit the website.

Nearby Historical Markers

Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Shrewsbury, MA, 01545

Through this place passed
General Henry Knox
in the winter of
1775 - 1776
to deliver to
General George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga used
to force the British Army
to evacuate Boston.

Erected by the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts 1927


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



MARLBOROUGH, MA, 01752

Through this place passed
General Henry Knox
in the winter of
1775 - 1776
to deliver to
General George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga used
to force the British Army
to evacuate Boston.

Erected by the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts 1927


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Southborough, MA, 01772

Through this place passed
General Henry Knox
in the winter of
1775 - 1776
to deliver to
General George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga used
to force the British Army
to evacuate Boston.

Erected by the Commonwealth
of Massachusetts 1927


Indian Reservation



Grafton, MA, 01536

These four and one-half acres have never belonged to the white man, having been set aside in 1728 as an Indian Reservation by the forty proprietors who purchased the Praying Indian town of Hassanamesit.

Mary Goodnow's Grave



Northborough, MA, 01532

Mary Goodnow who lived here with her parents was lame and unable to run to the garrison house for safety when the Indians attacked Northborough, August 18, 1707. A short path leads through the woods to her grave near the place where she fell.

Shrewsbury Minute Men



Shrewsbury, MA, 01545

One hundred and twenty-eight minute-men from Shrewsbury responded to the Lexington alarm April 19, 1775.
---------------------------
First Precinct Company - 65 men
Job Cushing - Captain
Asa Rice 1st Lieut ----------- Abner Miles 2nd Lieut
Artillery Company - 16 men
Ross Wyman - Captain
Second Precinct Company - 47 men
Robert Andrews - Captain
Jonal Temple 1st Lieut ----- Ezra Beaman


The Old Connecticut Path



Westborough, MA, 01581

An Indian trail before 1630 left the road here to go over Fay Mountain.

Williams Tavern



Marlborough, MA, 01752

The first tavern was erected on this site by Lieutenant Abraham Williams in 1665. Destroyed by Indians in 1676, it was promptly rebuilt and managed by the Williams Family until 1829. Here the early Circuit Courts convened, stage coaches changed horses, and historic personages tarried.

Community Histories


Marlborough
Northborough
Shrewsbury
Southborough
Westborough

Marlborough

John Howe, Sr. was recorded as marshal of Marlborough in 1638 and married to Mary Wetherbee. John Howe, Jr. in 1656 was a fur trader and built a house at the intersection of two Indian trails, Nashua Trail and Connecticut path. He could speak the language of the Algonquian Indians though the local tribe referred to themselves as the Pennacooks. The settlers were welcomed by the Indians because they protected them from other tribes they were at war with. In the 1650s, several families left the nearby town of Sudbury, 18 miles west of Boston, to start a new town. The village was named after Marlborough, the market town in Wiltshire, England. It was first settled in 1657 by 14 men led by Edmund Rice, John Ruddock and John Howe; in 1656 Rice and his colleagues petitioned the Massachusetts General Court to create the town of Marlborough and it was officially incorporated in 1660. Rice was elected a selectman at Marlborough in 1657. Sumner Chilton Powell wrote, in Puritan Village: The Formation of a New England Town, "Not only did Rice become the largest individual landholder in Sudbury, but he represented his new town in the Massachusetts legislature for five years and devoted at least eleven of his last fifteen years to serving as selectman and judge of small causes."

The Reverend William Brimstead was the first minister of the Puritan church and Johnathan Johnson was the first blacksmith.

Marlborough was one of the seven "Praying Indian Towns" because they were converted to Christianity by the Rev. John Eliot of Roxbury. In 1674 a deed was drawn up dividing the land between the settlers and the natives. This is the only record of names of the natives. The document was signed by:


Old Nequenit
Robin (Robin Hill in Marlborough is named after him)
Benjamin Wuttanamitt
Great James
Mary, the widow of Peter Naskonit, on behalf of her child David Moses
Assoake, the widow of James Norwell "On behalf of my children"
Sarah Conomy, sole executrix of my late husband Oomonog
Elizebeth, the only daughter and sole heir of Solomon, deceased. (Solomon Pond in Northborough is named after him and hence Solomon Pond Mall)
James Spence on behalf of his wife.

The settlement was almost destroyed by Native Americans in 1676 during King Philip's War.

In 1711 Marlborough's territory included Northborough, Southborough, Westborough and Hudson. As population, business, and travel grew in the colonies, Marlborough became a favored rest stop on the Boston Post Road. Many travelers stopped at its inns and taverns, including George Washington, who visited the Williams Tavern (see citation below) soon after his inauguration in 1789.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlborough,_Massachusetts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Northborough

Northborough was first settled in 1672. On January 24, 1766, the district of Northborough was established within neighboring Westborough. On August 23, 1775, the district became a town, and on June 20, 1807 part of neighboring Marlborough was annexed to Northborough.

The first Meeting House was established in 1746, with the legal governor of the town being called the Town Minister. The first Town Minister was Reverend John Martyn.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northborough,_Massachusetts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Shrewsbury

The Town of Shrewsbury, named for Shrewsbury, England, is a suburban community with an uneven and hilly terrain cut by a number of minor streams providing several small water power sites. Grants of land were made in what would eventually be the town beginning in 1664, with the 3,200-acre (13 km2) grant called Haynes Farm as the largest. Settlers came primarily from Sudbury and Marlborough and the first permanent settler was Gersham Wheelock in 1720. As a town, Shrewsbury was first settled in 1722 and officially incorporated in 1727.

Townspeople created an agricultural economy with apple orchards and by 1750 there were two stores and four taverns as well as several small industries in operation. The rapid fall of prices for agricultural goods, the shortage of hard currency and the general economic depression following the Revolutionary War produced disastrous conditions for colonists. Shays' Rebellion in 1786 sought to close the courts to prevent debt collections and the foreclosure of mortgages. Shrewsbury became a staging area for the rebellion and the encampment of the more than 400 insurgents, before the march on the Worcester Court House.

A leather industry began in 1786 in Shrewsbury and town farmers developed large cattle herds to support the manufacture of boots and shoes. This was followed by the establishment of gunsmithing operations in 1797 which produced rifles, shotguns and pistols and eventually cutlery. Luther Goddard began in 1809 by making brass clocks and then established a small watch factory employing a few skilled Swiss and English watchmakers. Lumbering created sawmills and they in turn drew chair and cabinet makers, plow and wagon builders.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrewsbury,_Massachusetts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Southborough

Southborough was first settled in 1660 and was officially incorporated in 1727. Southborough was primarily a farming community until mills began to tap the small rivers that ran through the town.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southborough,_Massachusetts", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Westborough

Before recorded time, the area now known as Westborough was a well travelled crossroads. As early as 7,000 B.C., prehistoric people in dugout canoes followed the Sudbury and Assabet Rivers to their headwaters in search of quartzite for tools and weapons. During the period from 1200-1600 A.D., seasonal migrations brought Nipmuc Indians to hunt and fish near Cedar Swamp and Lake Hoccomocco. Using Fay Mountain as a landmark, Indians crisscrossed Westborough on well worn paths: the old Connecticut Path leading west from Massachusetts Bay; the Narragansett Trail leading south, and the trail (along the present Milk Street) leading to Canada.

The early English explorer John Oldham followed these trails through Westborough in 1633, and settlers in search of fertile farmlands followed not long after. By late 1675, a few families had settled near Lake Chauncy, in the "west borough" of Marlborough.

On November 18, 1717, Westborough was incorporated as the hundredth town in Massachusetts, populated by twenty-seven families, including Thomas Rice who had represented Marlborough in the Great and General Court. Soon large farms were carved out, mills built along the Assabet River and Jackstraw Brook, and taverns flourished. Westborough's first minister, Reverend Ebenezer Parkman, shepherded the growing town of colonists through the years toward independence from Great Britain. Forty-six minutemen from Westborough fought under Captain Edmund Brigham in the Revolutionary War.

In 1775, Northborough split off as the "north borough" of Westborough, much as Westborough split off from Marlborough some 58 years before. However, the two towns shared a meetinghouse for some time more.

In 1810 the route from Boston to Worcester was straightened and improved into an official turnpike (the present Route 9), and along its Westborough route, the Wesson Tavern Common, Forbush Tavern and Nathan Fisher's store prospered. The center of commerce shifted downtown in 1824 with the arrival of the steam train through Westborough's center. The railroad brought a new era to the town industry: over the next century, local factories shipped boots and shoes, straw hats, sleighs, textiles, bicycles, and eventually abrasive products, across the nation. Westborough dairies supplied cities with milk and local greenhouses shipped out carnations, while the eight orchards found ready markets for their produce.

The industrial progress of the entire country is indebted to Westborough's most famous native son Eli Whitney Jr. Born in 1765, Whitney invented the cotton gin in 1795 after graduating from Yale, In 1798 he introduced mass production to the United States at his Whitney Arms Company in New Haven, Connecticut.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westborough", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0