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American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
Legend: Selected Site Area Merchant Site Historic Site Historic Marker Historic Shipwreck
Marker data courtesy of hmdb.org   Some map icons courtesy of Map Icons Collection



1776 Mayflower : A Story of Courage, Community, and War
The Federalist Papers Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution
Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West John Adams
Benjamin Franklin : An American Life The Bloody & Brave History of Native American Warriors & the Women Who Supported Them
Click here for additional books


We the Kids : The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States The New Americans : Colonial Times: 1620-1689 (The American Story)
The Notorious Benedict Arnold: A True Story of Adventure, Heroism & Treachery A History of US: Vol 3, From Colonies to Country (A History of Us)
Let It Begin Here!: Lexington & Concord: First Battles of the American Revolution George Washington, Spymaster: How the Americans Outspied the British and Won the Revolutionary War
They Called Her Molly Pitcher Now &  Ben : The Modern Inventions of Benjamin Franklin


Pirates and Traders: Gold! Hidden Treasures Hidden Object
Dedaloop (Kindle Fire Edition) Word Treasure
Treasure Island, The Experience Robinson Crusoe
The Patriots Hero Tales from American History - AudioBook

Selected Site

Gen. Henry Knox Trail


TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883





Through this place passed
Gen. Henry Knox
in the winter of 1775-1776
to deliver to
Gen. George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga
used to force the British
Army to evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
during the sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Click on heading to visit the website (excludes markers).

Nearby Historic Sites

Fort Ticonderoga



30 Fort Ti Rd
Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

French and Indian War Grand Encampment



739 Bridge Road
Crown Point, NY, 12928

Hancock House



6 Moses Circle
Ticonderoga , NY, 12883

Mount Independence



497 Mount Independence Road
Orwell, VT, 05760

Click on any heading to visit the website.

Nearby Historical Markers

"His Majesty’s Fort of Crown Point"



CROWN POINT, NY, 12928


"The fort is of wood, built in a most masterly manner. It has five Bastions, mounts 105 guns, and has casements for 4,000 Men, and to hold provisions de Guerre et de Bouche for four months. Within the Fort are good Stone Barracks for Officers and Men which … would conveniently contain 500 men."
Journal of Lord Adam Gordon August 1765

"There is a Large Fort begun. The Foundation is laid … built with timber and earth and is 25 feet thick. It is to be built twenty feet high. The inside of the Fort contains four and three quarters acres, and the trench around the fort is about 30 feet wide and is to be 14 feet deep. Besides, there are three small forts a-building, and I believe we shall be here until the cold weather drives us away. Our men are kept very hard at work Every Day; not time so much as to wash their clothes …."
Letter from Benjamin Crary, New York Militia
1st Sept. 1759 Camp at Crown Point


"The Black Watch"



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


The Saint Andrews Society of Glens Falls, N.Y. erected this tablet to commemorate the heroic gallantry of the 42d Regiment of Foot better known as "The Royal Highlanders" of "The Black Watch" who on July 8, 1758 lost here in killed and wounded over six hundred of the thousand men engaged.
--------------------------------
Mortally wounded on that day was their Major Duncan Campbell of Inverawe the hero of one of the most noted ghost stories of Scottish History and of Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem "Ticonderoga."

"The Black Watch"



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Sacred to the memory of
the gallant Highlanders of the
42nd Regiment of Foot
"The Black Watch"

From a regiment a thousand strong
205 died and 287 were wounded
July 8, 1758
assaulting the French lines on
the heights of Carillon

- Their Glory Shall Never Die -
----------
The Black Watch Council of Ticonderoga
The Society of Colonial War
in the State of New Jersey
The Society of Colonial Wars
in the State of New York
July 6, 1997


150th Anniversary of the Capture of This Fort



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


1775 - - - 1925
In commemoration
of the one hundred and
fiftieth anniversary
of the capture of this fort
May 10th 1775
which was the beginning of
the War of the Revolution in the
State of New York
and in memory of the brave men
French, British and American
who fought and died here.
This tablet is erected by
Alfred Weed Post
Grand Army of the Republic
and
Ticonderoga Post
American Legion


Abercrombie's Landing



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883

Fifteen thousand men landed here to attack Ticonderoga which was successfully defended by Montcalm July, 1758

Artillery Park



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883


Along this site in July, 1759,
British forces under Amherst
erected an artillery battery
to attack the French Fort at
Carillon, which they seized
and named Fort Ticonderoga.


Capture of Fort St. Frédéric



CROWN POINT, NY, 12928

This tablet is erected by the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York AD 1912 to commemorate the capture of Fort St. Frédéric and the erection of this fortress AD 1759 by the British and Provincial Army commanded by General Sir Jeffrey Amherst.

British Regiments
1st QR the Royal Regiment of Foot,
17th Regiment of Foot Forbes,
27th Inniskilling Regiment of Foot,
42nd Royal Highlanders - Black Watch,
55th Regiment of Foot - Prideaux,
77th Regiment Montgomery’s Highlanders,
80th Light Armed Regiment of Foot Gages,
Royal Artillery - Detachment of Sailors

Provincial Regiments
Col. Lyman’s - Connecticut,
Col. Whiting’s - Connecticut,
Col. Worcester's - Connecticut,
Col. Willard’s - Massachusetts,
Col. Ruggle’s - Massachusetts,
Col. Lovell’s - New Hampshire,
Col. Schuyler’s - New Jersey,
Col. Babcock’s - Rhode Island,
Rangers and Indians


Carillon Bridge



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

Near this spot in 1755-1756
Michel de Chartier de Lotbiniére
engineer of Fort Carillon, bridged this stream and harnessed this waterpower for the first time. Sawmills, storehouses and barracks were located here, being within the Seignory of Alainville granted by France in 1758 to Lotbiniére, this was the first patent covering site of Ticonderoga. His vast estate subsequently granted to British soldiers, Lotbiniére in 1776 refused England’s offer of compensation, preferring to aid Franklin in obtaining French support for the American cause.

Because of this sacrifice, unrequited by the Continental Congress, this bridge is gratefully dedicated to the Seignior of Alainville who was also an American patriot.

Erected by Ticonderoga Chapter, S.A.R.
and the State of New York. 1933


Carillon Outpost



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

Major outpost on Lake George, a small palisaded log fort, built in 1756 to defend Fort Carillon from British attack, & named Camp De Contrecoeur, stood in this vicinity.

Colonel Ethan Allen



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Dedicated to the memory of the gallant band of Patriots led by Colonel Ethan Allen who on the 10th of May, 1775 captured this important fortress and secured for the Americans a valuable base of operations on Lakes George and Champlain.

Erected by the Sons of the Revolution
in the State of New York
MDCCCC


Colonel John Brown



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


of Pittsfield, Mass.
killed October 19th, 1780 at Stone Arabia, N.Y. on his thirty-fifth birthday.
Was with Ethan Allen, May 10th, 1775.
Made a gallant attempt to retake the fort
September 17th to 22nd, 1777
but failed owing to the sturdy defence of
Brig. Gen. Henry W. Powell
Colonel Brown destroyed the shipping and outer works, captured 225 British and Germans and released 100 American prisoners.


Colonial Battles Fought in this Vicinity



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


The Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York erected this tablet to commemorate the colonial battles fought in this vicinity.
Champlain with Hurons and Algonquins defeated the Iroquois July 30, 1609 near the shore.
Montcalm defeated Abercrombie July 8, 1758 at the Assault of Fort Carillon or Ticonderoga.
Amherst captured the fort July 27, 1759.

Death of Lord Howe



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

Near this spot, July 6, 1758
Lord George Augustus Howe
was killed in a skirmish
preceding Abercrombie’s defeat
by Montcalm at Fort Carillon.


Fort Carillon



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Built by the French 1755-1758
General James Abercrombie
defeated by the
Marquis de Montcalm, July 8, 1758
Captured by Sir Jeffery Amherst
July 27, 1759
and renamed
Fort Ticonderoga
Captured by Ethan Allen
May 10, 1775
Captured by Sir John Burgoyne
July 6, 1777
Colonel John Brown repulsed
by General Powell Sept. 18, 1777.


Fort Ticonderoga



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883

During the 18th century, when nations fought to control the strategic route between the St. Lawrence River in Canada and the Hudson River to the south, the fortification overlooking the outlet of Lake George into Lake Champlain was called "the key to a continent."

The French constructed here in 1755 the stronghold they named Carillon, and made it a base to attack their English rivals. In 1758, Carillon, under Marquis de Montcalm, withstood assault by superior British forces. The next year Jeffery Amherst’s troops captured Carillon and forced the French to retreat from Lake Champlain. The British renamed the fortress Fort Ticonderoga.

During the American Revolution, Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys captured Ticonderoga in a surprise attack, May 10, 1775. Cannon hauled from Ticonderoga to Boston helped George Washington drive the British from that city. In July, 1777, General Burgoyne’s invading army overwhelmed the American fort, and Ticonderoga again became British. Americans unsuccessfully attacked the fort in September, 1777; later the British abandoned it.

In 1816, William Ferris Pell acquired the fort. His descendants began its restoration and in 1909 opened Ticonderoga to the public. Now the Fort Ticonderoga Association maintains the historic fort and its military museum.

From this point south…



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

From this point south, this street follows the route of the Indian carry between the lakes and of Montcalm’s military road traversed by Washington and Franklin during the Revolution.

Erected by Ticonderoga Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution
1925


Garrison Cemetery



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Here are buried several
hundred officers and men of
the American Army, chiefly
New York, New Jersey and
Pennsylvania Militia 1775-77.


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


From this fortress went
Gen. Henry Knox
in the winter of 1775-1776
to deliver to
Gen. George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga
used to force the British
Army to evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
during the sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Through this place passed
Gen. Henry Knox
in the winter of 1775-1776
to deliver to
Gen. George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga
used to force the British
Army to evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
during the sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883


Through this place passed
Gen. Henry Knox
in the winter of 1775-1776
to deliver to
Gen. George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga
used to force the British
Army to evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
during the sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


George Augustus Viscount Howe



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


To commemorate
the heroic gallantry and
noble character
of
George Augustus
Viscount Howe
Brigadier-General
of
His Majesty’s Forces
in America.
Killed near Trout Brook
two days before
the great battle of Carillon
July 6, 1758.
His death an irreparable loss
to the Army.
Beloved and honored
by the officers and men
of both the British
and American regiments.
Erected by
The English Speaking Union
of the United States
1958


Grand Carry Landing



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

This tablet marks the landing for the grand carry on the Great War Trail between the Indian tribes of the north and south country. It also marks the beginning of that carry between the lakes to avoid the falls and rapids, which later became the Military Road built by the French in 1755.

The French saw mill, the first ever built in the Champlain Valley, was erected in 1756 at the foot of the falls on the site of the present mills. In this saw mill, Abercromby had his headquarters during his disastrous battle with Montcalm’s forces at the French lines July 8, 1758.

Washington and Franklin passed over this Military Road during the Revolution.

Presented to the Ticonderoga Historical Society for the citizens of the town by the Ticonderoga Paper Company. Unveiled by the New York State Historical Association, October 4, 1910.

Hut Sites



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Within a radius of one-half
mile were 150 huts
occupied by American
troops in the Revolution
1775 - 1777.


Indian Trail



PUTNAM STATION, NY, 12861


Through this pass to Trout
Brook ran an Indian Trail,
used by Robert Rogers after
Battle on Snowshoes, 1758,
on retreat to Ft. Wm. Henry
Ticonderoga Historical Society


Indian Trail



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883

Battling French & Indians and on retreat from Snowshoe Battle in 1758, Rogers' Rangers crossed over this mountain where Rogers staged his legendary escape at Rogers Rock on Lake George.

Israel Putnam



Crown Point, NY, 12928


182 feet
north of this spot
stood the oak
to which
Israel Putnam
was tied and tortured
by the Indians in 1758


Military Road



Orwell, VT, 05760


Military Road
from Mount
Independence to
Hubbardton
1777
Marked by Hands
Cove Chapter
D.A.R. 1933


Mount Defiance



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883

Cannon placed on the summit
of Mt. Defiance by British
artillery officers under
Burgoyne July, 1777 forced
evacuation of Ft. Ticonderoga.


Mount Independence



Orwell, VT, 05760

Fortification was begun in June of 1776, and the name Mount Independence was bestowed following the Declaration of Independence. Lieut. Col. Jeduthan Baldwin was the chief construction engineer. Here the exhausted American Army, Northern Department, was stationed after withdrawing from its disastrous Canadian Campaign. Built on a rocky plateau and stoutly fortified, the post was a natural stronghold facing any approaching foe from the north. Within its rugged confines thousands of New Englanders, many succumbing to illness and lack of supplies, were quartered. Because of its commanding position and formidable battle works, which made it more powerful at the moment than impaired Ticonderoga, it checked for a year a British thrust southward, until at the fall of its companion fortress across the channel it was evacuated in the early morning darkness of July 6, 1777. This critical year of reprieve gave the American forces time to organize farther south, meet and destroy General Burgoyne at Saratoga, win French support, and eventually subdue General Cornwallis at Yorktown, fulfilling the prophecy of the mountain’s name.

Erected by Vermont Society Sons of the American Revolution in observance of the Bicentennial year of Independence, 1976.

Mt. Independence Military Road



Orwell, VT, 05760


After Ethan Allen seized Fort Ticonderoga, the Americans built Fort Mt. Independence, northwest from here on the Lake. Following Burgoyne’s invasion, Gen. St Clair evacuated the Forts, retreating across these hills to Hubbardton.
Vermont Historic Sites Commission


Near this spot stood Montcalm



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Near this spot stood Louis-Joseph de Gozon Marquis de Montcalm on the 8th of July 1758. With a small force of French troops and Canadian volunteers, he prevented the capture of Fort Carillon by defeating a much superior British and Colonial army under General James Abercrombie
This monument erected
in 1927 to honor a brave
and gallant gentleman


Old Military Road



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Used by troops during early
Colonial Wars and during
the American Revolution.


Old Military Road



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883


Along this street ran the
old military road fortified
in 1759 by General Amherst
prior to the siege at
Fort Ticonderoga.


Rogers’ Rangers



Ticonderoga, NY, 12883


Robert Rogers and 74 of his
Rangers in Jan. 1757 in this
vicinity fought superior
French forces for several
hours and successfully escaped.
Ticonderoga Historical Society


Ruins of Pre-Revolutionary Village



CROWN POINT, NY, 12928

500 Ft Ruins of Pre-Revolutionary Village and Trading Post

Streetroad Cemetery



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883

One of the earliest common burying grounds of historic Ticonderoga. Memorialized here are many first settlers, early doctors and supervisors, the town’s first State Senator, veterans of the Revolutionary, 1812, and Civil Wars. Last burial of a Civil War veteran in 1936. Opposite were the Streetroad Commons, church, school, community hall, post office, and general store.

The Barracks



CROWN POINT, NY, 12928

These barracks were constructed in the fashionable Georgian style of the day, uncommon in the northern interior of New York in the mid-18th century. The soldiers’ barracks is composed of four dwelling units of four rooms. Each doorway opens into a hallway flanked by two rooms. Originally, the hall contained a stairway to two rooms on the second story.

Between twelve and eighteen soldiers occupied each room. Officers were allowed one or more rooms according to rank, and non-commissioned officers (subalterns) were quartered two to a room. Soldiers were allotted one-half cord of wood per room each week for cooking and heating, and one pound of candles for light. Six beds and twelve blankets were provided for a room housing twelve men, as were an iron pot, candlestick, bucket and axe. Clean sheets, when available, were issued once a month during the 1760s.

The British at Crown Point



CROWN POINT, NY, 12928

Following the French retreat from Crown Point in 1759, General Amherst embarked upon an ambitious plan to secure the area for Britain. An elaborate system of fortifications was begun on the Point; at times as many as 3,000 soldiers and artisans were engaged in the construction of Fort Crown Point, three smaller forts (called redoubts), several blockhouses, storehouses, gardens, and military roads. A village grew up close to the fort walls, with a tavern, store, apothecary shop, and the homes of soldiers’ families and retired officers. When control of Canada passed to Britain at the end of the French and Indian War in 1763, construction ceased, leaving one barracks building unfinished.

In April 1773, a chimney fire spread from the soldiers’ barracks to the log walls of the fort, resulting in the explosion of the powder magazine and the virtual destruction of the main fort. Troop strength was gradually reduced until only a tiny garrison remained to surrender the fort to American rebel troops commanded by Seth Warner in May 1775.

The French Lines



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


Built by troops under
Montcalm July 6-7, 1758.
Repaired by
American troops 1776.


Through this entrance . . .



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


1776                         1929
Through this entrance to the place D’Armes of the fort have passed

George Washington, Ethan Allen, Benjamin Franklin, Seth Warner, Benedict Arnold, Major Robert Rogers, Horatio Gates, The Marquis de Montcalm, Anthony Wayne, The Duc de Levis, Arthur St. Clair, Sir Jeffrey Amherst, Henry Knox, Sir Guy Carleton, Philip Schuyler, Major John Andre, Richard Montgomery, Sir John Burgoyne, Thaddeus Kosciusko

and a host of other great men of our history
You who tread in their footsteps remember
their glory
Donor A. Stanley Miller

Troops of Colonial Wars at Ticonderoga



TICONDEROGA, NY, 12883


In tribute
to the heroism of the troops under the unfortunate
Maj. Gen’l. James Abercromby
in the attack on the French lines, July 8th, 1758,
to mark the capture of Fort Carillon by
Lieut. Gen’l. Sir Jeffrey Amherst
July 27th, 1759
and, to record the names of the British and American military units which served in the Colonial Wars at Ticonderoga.

This monument is erected by the
Society of Colonial Wars
1949


Community Histories


Crown Point
Orwell
Ticonderoga

Crown Point

Two forts were built (c. 1731) near the current location of the town, Fort St. Frédéric by the French and later Fort Crown Point by the British.

During colonial times and the American Revolutionary War, its strategic location often made Crown Point an important location. Situated on the west shore of Lake Champlain about 15 miles north of Fort Ticonderoga it provided a fortified position about a day's travel north of that site.

After the failure of the American Invasion of Canada in 1776, it represented the northernmost point of American control. During the British Saratoga Campaign in 1777, General Burgoyne organized a supply magazine here to support his attack of Ticonderoga.

The Town of Crown Point is an original town of the county, established in 1786 before Essex County was created. Parts of Crown Point were used to form the Towns of Elizabethtown (1798) and Willsboro (1788).

The modern settlement of the town began around 1800 with an influx of settlers from Vermont.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_Point,_New_York ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Orwell

After the construction of Fort Independence on Mount Independence in 1775, rebel soldiers bravely manned the lesser fortifications of the Vermont-side defenses. While those soldiers billeted at Fort Ticonderoga enjoyed comparatively splendid conditions in the French-style fort, Mount Independence proved a trying and difficult environment for its small cadre of revolutionary defenders, who frequently returned to their farms in the surrounding countryside to tend to their homesteads. The fortress was passed between the British and Colonials, until it was eventually abandoned at the cessation of hostilities on the northern front of the war.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orwell,_Vermont", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Ticonderoga

The crossing between Lakes George and Champlain had been used by natives for thousands of years. In the 17th century, French explorers such as Samuel de Champlain explored the area.

The town was located on the direct route, utilizing rivers and two long lakes, between New York City to the south and the French settlement of Montreal to the north. The town was the setting for historic battles and maneuvers during both the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War. Fort Ticonderoga, constructed by the French, who called it Fort Carillon, in the 1750s, marked the location of an important portage between the two lakes. The town of Ticonderoga was formed in 1804 from part of the town of Crown Point. By the end of the 18th Century, town was noted for wood products such as paper and lead pencils. The position of the now former Ticonderoga village at the north end of Lake George made it an important port.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ticonderoga,_New_York ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0