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American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
American Revolution History by ColonialAmerica.com
Legend: Selected Site Area Merchant Site Historic Site Historic Marker Historic Shipwreck
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Selected Site

Van Schaick Mansion

1 Van Schaick Avenue
Cohoes, NY, 12047




Click on heading to visit the website (excludes markers).

Nearby Historic Sites

Cherry Hill



523 1/2 South Pearl Street
Albany, NY, 12202

Friends of Schuyler Mansion



32 Catherine St
Albany, NY, 12202

Knickerbocker Mansion



132 Knickerbocker Rd
Schaghticoke, NY, 12154

Click on any heading to visit the website.

Nearby Historical Markers

Albany - Capital of New York 200 Years



Albany, NY, 12207

In Honor of the 200th Anniversary of the
1797           City of Albany           1997
Serving as the Capital City of the State of New York

For twenty years, after the establishment of the State of new York in 1777, the State Legislature moved annually among New York City, Poughkeepsie, Kingston and Albany for its meetings. As the upstate population grew, its elected representatives lobbied to establish a permanent state capital in a central location. On January 3, 1797, the New York State Legislature convened at the old Albany City Hall (Stadt Huys), where they had met periodically during and after the Revolutionary War. On March 10, 1797, a bill calling for the erection of a state office building in the City of Albany passed both houses of the legislature. The new law also established the offices of the Secretary of State, Clerk of the Supreme Court, Comptroller and Treasurer in Albany. A provision of the law also said that the Senate and Assembly would convene in the City of Albany on the first Tuesday of January, rendering it the seat of State government.

Dedicated to and for the
People of the State of New York
The Honorable George E. Pataki           The Honorable Gerald D. Jennings
Governor, State of New York                        Mayor, City of Albany       
May 28, 1997


Camp Van Schaick



WATERFORD, NY, 12188

Continental Army, Northern
Department under command
General Philip Schuyler
General Horatio Gates
Aug. 15 - Sept. 8, 1777


Camp Van Schaick



WATERFORD, NY, 12188

Encampment of the Northern
Department Continental Army
August 9-September 8-1777
from this place August 9-1777
Gen. Ebenezer Learned
with his Massachusetts Brigade
marched to relieve
Fort Stanwix


Fort Frederick



Albany, NY, 12207

In the Middle of this Street
To the East Stood
Fort Frederick
Goal of Burgoyne's Drive to
Split the Colonies - 1777


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Crescent Station, NY, 12047

Through this Place Passed
Gen. Henry Knox
In the Winter of 1775 - 1776
To Deliver To
Gen. George Washington
At Cambridge
The Train of Artillery
From Fort Ticonderoga
Used to Force the British
Army to Evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
During the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Colonie, NY, 12110

Through this place passed
Gen. Henry Knox
in the Winter of 1775 - 1776
to deliver to
Gen. George Washington
at Cambridge
the train of artillery
from Fort Ticonderoga
used to force the British
Army to evacuate Boston

Erected By
The State of New York
during the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Mechanicville, NY, 12118

Through this Place Passed
Gen. Henry Knox
In the Winter of 1775 - 1776
To Deliver To
Gen. George Washington
At Cambridge
The Train of Artillery
From Fort Ticonderoga
Used to Force the British
Army to Evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
During the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Rensselaer, NY, 12144

Through this Place Passed
Gen. Henry Knox
In the Winter of 1775 - 1776
To Deliver To
Gen. George Washington
At Cambridge
The Train of Artillery
From Fort Ticonderoga
Used to Force the British
Army to Evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
During the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Waterford, NY, 12188

Through this Place Passed
Gen. Henry Knox
In the Winter of 1775 - 1776
To Deliver To
Gen. George Washington
At Cambridge
The Train of Artillery
From Fort Ticonderoga
Used to Force the British
Army to Evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
During the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Gen. Henry Knox Trail



Albany, NY, 12204

Through this Place Passed
Gen. Henry Knox
In the Winter of 1775 - 1776
To Deliver To
Gen. George Washington
At Cambridge
The Train of Artillery
From Fort Ticonderoga
Used to Force the British
Army to Evacuate Boston

Erected by
The State of New York
During the Sesquicentennial
of the American Revolution


Loudoun Ferry Road



Colonie, NY, 12047

1755 Constructed as Military Road from
Albany to Lake George by Provincial
Troops from New York, New England
and New Jersey under command of
Major General William Johnson
- - -
Named in honor of Major General
John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudoun.
Commander in Chief of His Majesty's
Forces in America, French and Indian War
- - -
1776 General Henry Knox's Train
of Artillery crossed here
to aid General George Washington
in the Siege of Boston
- - -
Military Route Northern Department
Continental Army
- - -
1777 Used as camp ground
of General Enoch Poor's Brigade


Trade Partners Along the Hudson



Rensselaer, NY, 12144



First Inhabitants
Mahican Indians, known today as Mohicans by the Mohican Nation, were Algonquian-speaking people who inhabited this spot as early as the 1400s. Mahicans gathered here, at Schaghticoke, Cohoes, and at DeLaets and Schodack Islands long before Henry Hudson claimed this area for the Netherlands in 1609. The Dutch established Fort Nassau in 1614 directly across the river, (today the Port of Albany) to trade with the region's Native Americans.

Rensselaerswijck
In 1630, the Dutch West India Company granted Kilian van Rensselaer 700,000 acres on which he was to place 50 families and a village. He planned to develop the more thriving hub of the community on the river's eastern shore, but the company thwarted that development. On the western shore, Van Rensselaer's landholding surrounded Fort Orange.

On the eastern shore in the Greenbush (named for its abundant pines) Van Rensselaer's farming estate and the village of DeLaetsburgh, which included mills, trades shops, a distillery, a brewery, and farms were established. In a 1642 letter, Jeremias van Rensselaer referred to the Greenbush farm as Crayloo (Crow's Wood), named for the family's farm in the Netherlands.

Uncle Sam



Troy, NY, 12180

Nickname of Samuel Wilson
of Troy which was given near
here to United States from
markings of U.S. on military
supplies in War of 1812


Van Schaick Mansion



Cohoes, NY, 12047

1735 - 1927
Van Schaick Mansion
Home Of
John G. Van Schaick
and his Wife Anna Patriot Americans
Built by Anthony Van Schaick
Son of Goosen Gerritsen original patentee
Headquarters
August 18-September 8-1777
Northern Department Continental Army
General Philip Schuyler
General Horatio Gates

Here was planned the Saratoga Campaign
And here August 19-1777
General Gates assumed command
From this place August 15-1777
General Benedict Arnold and his force
marched to relieve Fort Stanwix
Beneath this roof were received
Governor George Clinton
Gen. Benjamin Lincoln · Gen. Enoch Poor
Gen. Ebenezer Learned · Gen. John Stark
Col. Peter Gansevoort · Col. Daniel Morgan
Colonel Tadeusz Kosciuszko
Engineer of the fortifications on
Peebles Island and at Bemis Heights
Here also after the surrender
were entertained
General John Burgoyne and his staff
Erected by the Cohoes Historical Society
and the State of New York - 1927


Community Histories


Albany
Cohoes
Latham
Mechanicville
Rensselaer
Schaghticoke
Troy
Waterford

Albany

Albany is one of the oldest surviving European settlements from the original thirteen colonies and the longest continuously chartered city in the United States. The area was originally inhabited by Algonquian Indian tribes and was given different names by the various peoples. The Mohican called it Pempotowwuthut-Muhhcanneuw, meaning "the fireplace of the Mohican nation", while the Iroquois called it Sche-negh-ta-da, or "through the pine woods". Albany's first European structure was a primitive fort on Castle Island built by French traders in 1540. It was destroyed by flooding soon after construction.

Permanent European claims began when Englishman Henry Hudson, exploring for the Dutch East India Company on the Half Moon (Dutch: Halve Maen), reached the area in 1609, claiming it for the United Netherlands. In 1614, Hendrick Christiaensen rebuilt the French fort as Fort Nassau, the first Dutch fur-trading post in present-day Albany. Commencement of the fur trade provoked hostility from the French colony in Canada and amongst the natives, all of whom vied to control the trade. In 1618, a flood ruined the fort on Castle Island, but it was rebuilt in 1624 as Fort Orange. Both forts were named in honor of the Dutch royal House of Orange-Nassau. Fort Orange and the surrounding area were incorporated as the village of Beverwijck (Template:Named after the town of Beverwijk in the west of Holland) in 1652.

When New Netherland was captured by the English in 1664, the name Beverwijck was changed to Albany, in honor of the Duke of Albany (later James II of England and James VII of Scotland). Duke of Albany was a Scottish title given since 1398, generally to a younger son of the King of Scots. The name is ultimately derived from Alba, the Gaelic name for Scotland. The Dutch briefly regained Albany in August 1673 and renamed the city Willemstadt; the English took permanent possession with the Treaty of Westminster (1674). On November 1, 1683, the Province of New York was split into counties, with Albany County being the largest. At that time the county included all of present New York State north of Dutchess and Ulster Counties in addition to present-day Bennington County, Vermont, theoretically stretching west to the Pacific Ocean; the city of Albany became the county seat. Albany was formally chartered as a municipality by provincial Governor Thomas Dongan on July 22, 1686. The Dongan Charter was virtually identical in content to the charter awarded to the city of New York three months earlier. Dongan created Albany as a strip of land 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and 16 miles (26 km) long. Over the years Albany would lose much of the land to the west and annex land to the north and south. At this point, Albany had a population of about 500 people.

In 1754, representatives of seven British North American colonies met in the Stadt Huys, Albany's city hall, for the Albany Congress; Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania presented the Albany Plan of Union there, which was the first formal proposal to unite the colonies. Although it was never adopted by Parliament, it was an important precursor to the United States Constitution. The same year, the French and Indian War, the fourth in a series of wars dating back to 1689, began; it ended in 1763 with French defeat, resolving a situation that had been a constant threat to Albany and held back its growth. In 1775, with the colonies in the midst of the Revolutionary War, the Stadt Huys became home to the Albany Committee of Correspondence (the political arm of the local revolutionary movement), which took over operation of Albany's government and eventually expanded its power to control all of Albany County. Tories and prisoners of war were often jailed in the Stadt Huys alongside common criminals. In 1776, Albany native Philip Livingston signed the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

During and after the Revolutionary War, Albany County saw a great increase in real estate transactions. After Horatio Gates' win over John Burgoyne at Saratoga in 1777, the upper Hudson Valley was generally at peace as the war raged on elsewhere. Prosperity was soon seen all over Upstate New York. Migrants from Vermont and Connecticut began flowing in, noting the advantages of living on the Hudson and trading at Albany, while being only a few days' sail from New York City. Albany reported a population of 3,498 in the first national census in 1790, an increase of almost 700% since its chartering. In 1797, the state capital of New York was moved permanently to Albany.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albany,_New_York ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Cohoes

The majority of the city was once part of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, a Dutch colonial feudal system; however the land north of a line crossing the Cohoes Falls (today Manor Avenue) was outside of the Manor and was owned by the Van Olohde family between 1725 and 1750. Rensselaerswyck was established by Killiaen Van Rensselaer, the patroon and a Dutch merchant. In 1632 he had an agent of his pace off an enormous triangle-shaped area around the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson rivers, from the Peebles Island northwest to the Cohoes Falls and south to today's Watervliet; this area was the core of the future city of Cohoes. Starting in the 1690s the Patroon began to issue leases for the area of Cohoes, though he did reserve for himself a strip below the Cohoes Falls for the future site of mills.

Though the area wasn't immediately heavily settled it was well known for many reasons. The main was geographic, with the Cohoes Falls being the centerpiece. One of the earliest descriptions of the falls was in 1642 by Johannes Megapolensis, the first dominie (Reverend) of Beverwyck. Another early description was in 1656 by Adriaen van der Donck in his Description of New Netherland. In the early-to-mid 17th century a whale had found itself stranded in the Mohawk River on an island just below the Cohoes Falls, it was impossible for the Dutch settlers of the area to remove the carcass and as it rotted the river became slick for three weeks from the rotting carcass and one commented that "the air was infected with its stench... perceptible for two miles to leeward"; around 1646 this island came to be known as Whale Island due to this occurrence.

During the various French and Indian Wars during the mid-18th century Van Schaick Island became the site of a military road that came from Albany north along the islands at the mouth of the Mohawk River. These islands allowed for easier fords across the various mouths of the Mohawk and access to Waterford and points north. The islands would be the site of many military encampments during both the French and Indian Wars and the US Revolutionary War. The Van Schaick Mansion on Van Schaick Island was built in the 1730s and was one of the sites used as a military headquarters by the Americans under General Philip Schuyler and General Horatio Gates. Van Schaick Island was the first part of Cohoes to be settled and farmed, it was formerly known as Cohoes Island and Anthony's Island.

Until the Revolutionary war Cohoes was a small quiet hamlet with isolated farms, after the Revolution things slowly began to pick up and Cohoes was linked to the larger settlements of Lansingburg and Albany. In 1795 at Cohoes the first bridge across the Mohawk River was constructed, it was 900 feet long, 24 feet wide, 15 feet high and sat on 13 stone piers. It cost $12,000 to build and was a toll bridge. This bridge increased the importance of Cohoes as it became one of the main routes north. It was rebuilt in 1806 by the Cohoes Bridge Company and tolls increased. The Erie and Champlain Canals were begun in 1817 and the section in Cohoes finished in 1823, they would impact Cohoes in every aspect, Cohoes was even known as Juncta because of this. Every farm in Cohoes was crossed by one or both of the canals, and Cohoes was the site of the junction of the two canals. Even with the canals and the bridge bringing easier access to larger markets Cohoes was a sleepy place to be in prior to 1831, the nearest post office was at Waterford and fresh meat and groceries were a luxury hard to come by in Cohoes. A post office in Cohoes was finally built in 1831.

In 1811 the Cohoes Manufacturing Company, owned entirely by men from Lansingburg, was incorporated and began a factory for making screws, this would be the first use of large industry in Cohoes and the harnessing of the Mohawk River and Cohoes Falls for power.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cohoes,_New_York ", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Latham

The Old Loudon Road was built in 1755 during the French and Indian War to bring troops and provisions from Albany to the areas of Lake George and Ticonderoga. The Troy and Schenectady Turnpike was built in 1802 and intersected Old Loudon. An early first resident of this hamlet was Jonas Yearsley, 1785, who later built the first hotel close to this intersection. The hamlet was known first under the name of Yearsley's Corners and years afterward as Van Vrankens Corners in the 1850s.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latham,_New_York", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Mechanicville

The first European settlers on the Tenendeho Creek in the area of today's Mechanicville arrived in 1764. Actually, the first listing for a settlement on Thenendehowa Creek is in 1721. At that time, Cornelius Van Buren had a sawmill at the mouth of the creek where it emptied into the Hudson. The first documented occurrence of the name "Mechanicville" dates back to 1829. The name comes from the early settlers, who were independent mastercraftsmen such as millers, carpenters, or butchers, whose professions were commonly known as the "mechanical arts" at the time.

About 35 years later, small flour mills were already established. When the Champlain Canal reached the settlement in 1823, and especially when the Saratoga and Renselaer Railway laid a track through the area in 1835, Mechanicville became an important commerce interchange.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanicville", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Rensselaer

The natives of the area called it Petuquapoern and Juscum catick, and the Dutch claimed the land in 1609 based on Henry Hudson's exploration of the Hudson River. Later the area was called De Laet's Burg in honor of one of the directors of the Dutch West India Co. Settlement occurred at least as early as 1628. By 1642 there was a brewery and many farms, also a ferry was established by Hendrick Albertsen running from the mouth of Beaver Creek in Beverwyck (Albany) to the future Rensselaer. Greenbush (originally t'Greyn Bos in Dutch) was the earliest settlement from Dutch times. The hamlet of East Albany was part of the village of Greenbush. The second hamlet that would be incorporated was Bath (also Bath-on-Hudson), which was laid out in 1795 and settled even earlier, it was incorporated as a village prior to 1874.

The Van Rensselaer family, which were the feudal landholders of the entire future Rensselaer County built a residence in the future city of Rensselaer. This property was inherited by Hendrick van Rensselaer, Kiliaen van Rensselaer's grandson, who built Fort Crailo in approximately 1712. It was built on the site of where Dominie Megapolensis built his own house in 1642. Crailo was expanded in 1762-1768. At various times, the grounds were used as a campground for British and colonial troops. It is reportedly the place where, in 1755, British Army surgeon Richard Shuckburgh, quartered in the home, wrote the ditty "Yankee Doodle" to mock the colonial troops who fought with the British in the French and Indian Wars. Fort Crailo was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961.

The hamlet of Greenbush was a tract of land about one square mile in size, and is that portion of the city between Partition and Mill Street. This was purchased in May 1810 by William Akin, Titus Goodman and John Dickinson from Stephen Van Rensselaer and Stephen N. Bayard, assignees of John J. Van Rensselaer. The village was later incorporated in 1815.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rensselaer,_New_York", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Schaghticoke

The first permanent settlement began around 1668. The town, one of the original county towns, was formed in 1788 from a previously established district (1772 in Albany County).

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schaghticoke_(town),_New_York", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Troy

Prior to the arrival of Europeans, the Troy area was inhabited by the Muh-he ka-ne-ok, known to the Europeans as the Mohican Indian tribe. This Algonquian-speaking people had probably lived in the area for thousands of years. The Mohican called the general Troy area Paanpack and referred to the Hudson River as Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk, or "where the waters were never still". It's not surprising that the area would be populated by hunter-gatherers: the land was arable, the forests were filled with game, and the river was known for being well populated with fish; one Dutch settler described the Hudson as "seer visryck", which is Dutch for "very fish rich".

There were at least three clans within the tribe: Wolf, Turtle, and Turkey. Regardless, the entire tribe was led by one sachem (chief). Skiwias, sometimes known as Aepjen, was sachem for some 20 years and led the tribe during the first encounters and land sales with the Dutch. The tribe had at least two settlements near Troy. One was either near present-day Hoosick Street or along the banks of the Poesten Kill and was called Unawatt's Castle. The other was located on Peeble's Island, on the west side of the Hudson, across from Lansingburgh, and was called Moenemine's Castle. A third settlement may also have existed on the east side of the Hudson at Lansingburgh, across from Moenemine's Castle. The natives typically lived in domed wigwams or longhouses, and usually settled near the river or on higher ground nearby. It is thought that more than 8,000 Mohican inhabitants lived in the area at the time of the Dutch arrival.

The land comprising the Poesten Kill and Wynants Kill areas were owned by two Mohicans. The area around the Poesten Kill was owned by Skiwias and was called Panhooseck. The area around the Wynants Kill was owned by Peyhaunet and was named Paanpack, meaning "the Great Meadow". The land between the creeks, which makes up most of downtown and South Troy, was owned by Annape. South of the Wynants Kill and into present-day North Greenbush, the land was owned by Pachquolapiet. These parcels of land were sold to the Dutch between 1630 and 1657 and each purchase was overseen and signed by Skiwias. In total, more than 75 individual Mohicans were involved in deed signings.

By 1708, the Mohican had sold all the land that now makes up Troy. Whether what they received as payment was fair is up for discussion. Rittner, in his history of Troy, states, "According to the deeds, land was sold for rugs, muskets, kettles, gunpowder, bars of lead, fur caps, shirts, strings of wampum, strings of tobacco, a child's coat and shirt, knives, hatchet, adze, pouches, socks, duffel coat, beaver, bread, beer, a piece of cloth, a cutlass, axes, jugs of rum, blankets, duffel coats, guns, Madeira wine, pipes, and five shillings," adding, "Some would say today that it wasn't a very good trade."

The upper Hudson River was first explored by Henry Hudson in 1609 and it is said that the Mohican greeted the newcomers excitedly, eager to begin a trading relationship. While the Mohicans coexisted peacefully with the Dutch, they had a hostile relationship with the nearby Mohawk tribe to the west. The Mohicans were originally not happy with the idea of selling their land to the Dutch, but the outcome of a bloody war with the Mohawks in 1629 led them to move north to Schaghticoke and make their land available for purchase. They lost another war with the Mohawks in 1666, which led many of them to move to Stockbridge, Massachusetts. The tribe's disappearance from the area is the basis of James Fenimore Cooper's novel Last of the Mohicans.

The first European settlement in the area was Fort Orange, a barricaded trading post built by the Dutch West India Company on the site of present-day Albany near the west bank of the North River. The fort was built mainly to exploit and expand upon the thriving fur trade in the area.

The land on which Troy now sits was purhcased by the wealthy Dutch jeweler and one of the directors of the Dutch West India Company, Kiliaen van Rensselaer (namesake of Rensselaer County). The land was deeded over several transactions in the 1630s and became the patroonship of Rensselaerswyck, a feudal colonial government that covered most of present-day Albany and Rensselaer Counties.

While most members of the Dutch West India Company saw settlement of the area profitable due only to the fur trade, van Rensselaer also saw potential in creating a self-sustaining colony that could trade goods with settlements as far away as South America and Europe. Janny Venema, in her history Beverwijck, states, "While Indians would continue to bring furs to the settlement, New Netherland could provide Brazil with wheat, and Brazil would then send its costly sugar to the fatherland. Rensselaerswijck would make New Netherland a great wheat supplier, filling an important place in the company's great Atlantic scheme."

Rensselaerswyck offered leases to inhabitants (whom originally were sent to the colony by van Rensselaer himself) but did not offer the option to buy land from the patroon. Van Rensselaer named the area around Troy "Pafraets Dael" (Pafraet's Part), which is indicated on the first map of Rensselaerswyck (c. 1632). The name originates from his mother's maiden name, Maria Pafraet.

The first farm raised on the site of Troy was that of Thomas Chambers, who leased land along the Hudson River between the Poesten Kill and Wynants Kill from 1647 to 1654. It is believed that this was the first settlement on the east side of the river north of the present-day city of Rensselaer, making it the first settlement in Troy. Additionally, Jan Barentsz Wemp leased Chambers' farm following the latter's departure and proceeded to build the area's first mill on the Poesten Kill near today's Hill Street and Spring Avenue. Wemp sometimes went by the nickname Poest, which is indeed seen in the early records of the colony. Wemp died in 1663 and his land was eventually subdivided and sold a number of times. In 1674, part of Wemp's original land, on a creek south of his sawmill, was sold to Wynant Gerritse Van der Poel, who built a mill there. These two men, Poest and Wynant, are the sources of today's names for the Poesten and Wynants Kills; kill is the Dutch word for creek.

The Hudson River was called North River by the Dutch. It would eventually become "Hudson's River" by the English.

In 1664, the English gained control of New Netherland during a surprise attack that eventually led to the Second Anglo-Dutch War. Making the transfer of power official, Jeremias van Rensselaer (the founding patroon's third son) swore an oath of allegiance to King Charles II that October. The former patroonships were respected by Charles, who confirmed them as manorial grants of England.

The Dutch regained New Netherland for a short time in August 1673, but the English were able to take it back over in November 1674.

In June 1707, Derick Van der Heyden purchased the farm of Pieter Van Woggelum, which included land that extended from the Poesten Kill to the Piscawen Kill, a creek that discharged into the Hudson at a point near present-day Hoosick Street. In 1720, the title of the property was confirmed to Van der Heyden by Hendrick Van Rensselaer, the interim patroon and grandson of the founding patroon. For the land, Van der Heyden—in addition to his heirs—was to pay "three and three-fourth bushels of wheat and two fat hens or capons, to the patroon of Rensselaerswyck" annually.

After a series of deed exchanges through deaths and transfers within the family, Derick Van der Heyden's original farm was split between three of his great-grandsons. Jacob I. Van der Heyden (1750–1801) owned the northern portion of the farm, which extended from present-day Grand Street to the Piscawen Kill; Jacob D. Van der Heyden (1758–1809) owned the central portion from Division Street to Grand Street; and Matthias Van der Heyden (1760–1825) owned the southern portion extending from the Poesten Kill to Division Street.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Troy,_New_York", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0


Waterford

The town is part of the Van Schaick land patent of 1687. The first settlement took place at the site of the current Waterford village, then called "Half Moon Point".

The town was formed in 1816 by splitting the area of southeastern Saratoga County known as Halfmoon (anglicized from the Dutch name Halve Maan) into the town of Halfmoon and the town of Waterford.

The village of Waterford is the oldest incorporated village in the US, having been incorporated in 1794, before the town was formed. Waterford has been host to "Canal Fest" and "Tugboat Roundup" celebrations for many years.

The Catawissa (tugboat), Northside Historic District, Ormsby-Laughlin Textile Companies Mill, Peebles (Peobles) Island, Urger (canal tugboat), and Waterford Village Historic District are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterford_(town),_New_York", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0